Didactical reflections considering the development of lifesaving competence in physical education students - with special regard to the interdependency of goal, content and method of teaching and the learning process of the students

TitleDidactical reflections considering the development of lifesaving competence in physical education students - with special regard to the interdependency of goal, content and method of teaching and the learning process of the students
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2007
Conference NameWorld Conference on Drowning Prevention
Date Published09/2007
PublisherInternational Life Saving Federation
Conference LocationPorto, Portugal
Other NumbersPO-09
Abstract

­The problem addressed arises out of experiences during teaching lifesaving to physical education students, where they show a lack of perceived competence1,3 in potentially life threatening situations (simulated situations in pool, the occurrence of which they were informed in the beginning of the course, but no details about when, what and where) and a low level of reflection concerning questions of extreme relevance in real-life examples of lifesaving (a qualitative ‘theoretical’ test consisting of 10 questions) – in spite of practical (14 lessons in pool) as well as theoretical (lectures, obligatory literature and studies) training and teaching during a 7-8 week period.

Therefore I ask whether our choice of teaching content and method of teaching to a satisfactory degree stimulates the learning process of the students in the direction of our desired goal and result of learning. The major goal being to act socially responsible and competent in “real-life” life saving situations. As a result I propose some changes in the practice of teaching that hopefully will help enhance the life saving competencies of our students after the course.

My outline of educational strategy is a competence based learning environment focusing on kinaesthetic as well as reflective4 learning processes, where the inseparable acquisition of technical skills and theoretical knowledge is as important a part as ever – the new focus points being

  1. a much higher degree of experience gathering
  2. an integration of the teaching content into a more complex functional context, case-studies being a preferable element
  3. increased student responsibility in the organization of the learning process and in reaching the desired result of learning.

All of three, if implemented successfully, ought to result in an increase of in-depth and varied personal and common assessments and interpretations integrated in and changing the social practice of the students.

References
  1. Bandura, A. (1997)  Self-efficacy. The exercise of control. New York: Freeman.
  2. Bruner (1996) The Culture of Education, Harvard University Press.
  3. Jørgensen, P. Schultz (2001) Competency reconsidered as a theoretical concept. Nordisk Psykologi, 53,181-208.
  4. Schön, D. (1987) Educating the reflective practitioner, Jossey Bass, San Fransisco.